What can school staff and govenors do?

Whatever you do, make a difference!

  • Read The Stonewall School and Teachers Report (see links page)

  • Undertake bi-annual pupil voice surveys

  • Use the data gathered from pupil voice surveys to inform all stakeholders of what the problems are and the priorities for action

  • Inform stakeholders of the statutory requirements from OFSTED and under the Equality Act and be clear on the effects of homophobic bullying

  • Ensure a specific homophobic bullying action plan forms part of the school development plan

  • Survey staff to see what existing skills, strengths and staff development needs exist

  • Contact organisations such as Diversity Role Models and Inclusion For All to bring LGBT role models to meet your staff

  • Review all polices, practices, handbooks, home-school agreements, bullying charters to ensure they explicitly mention homo phobic and transphobic bullying

  • Ensure all staff have and are using correct definitions (see 'definitions' page)

  • Ensure clearly communicated strategies are established to record and report homophobic incidents, begin consider how this data will be analysed and used

  • Audit school resources to see if they represent a range of different family groups

  • Invest in an on-going programme of staff development

  • Audit HR policies to ensure LGBT staff are supported and equally represented to enable them to be authentic at work

  • Use posters and slogans to start discussion

  • Ensure school website clearly communicated the vision for this work

  • Become a Stonewall School Champion

  • Visit Schools Out (see links page) and begin looking at lesson plans

  • Organise a Diversity Week, LGBT history month

  • Don't make assumptions about sexuality, family background or gender

Remember small steps can become BIG strides.

What can parents do?

Whatever you do, make a difference!

  • Read The Stonewall School and Teachers Report (see links page)

  • Ask the school for copies of relevant behaviour and anti-bullying policies, handbooks, home-school agreements, bullying charters to ensure they explicitly mention homo phobic and transphobic bullying

  • Ask the school what strategies it uses to monitor bullying in school, how is this evidence recorded? Do the children know who to what to report? How to report and who to report to?

  • Ask your child if they feel safe at school and around school.

  • Define, in age appropriate terms what the words lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender mean (for example 'when a man falls in love with another man, we call that being gay')

  • Ask the school to become a Stonewall School Champion

  • Be open about your own family group and any LBGT people in your lives

  • Ask the school to see examples of resources that represent a range of different families

  • Ask the school if they are going to organise a Diversity Week, LGBT history month

  • Ask the school how they reflect real life role models in school

  • Don't make assumptions about sexuality, family background or gender

Remember small steps can become BIG strides.

What can children do?

Whatever you do, make a difference!

  • Ask your School Council to run a bullying survey

  • Make sure you always report all kinds of bullying to a grown up

  • Make sure you know who in the school can help you

  • Make sure you know where to go for help if you are hurt

  • Ask your school to run a Diversity Week, Anti-Bullying Week or LGBT History Month celebration

  • Ask your teacher if you can learn about Harvey Milk and Alan Turing

  • Don't use the words gay or lesbian in a nasty way, just use them to describe people as gay or lesbian

  • Don't say that things such as trainers, jokes or pop groups are 'so gay'

  • Don't think that everyone has the same type of friends and family - many people have gay friends and family

  • Run an anti-homphobic bullying poster campaign or assembly

  • Be clear in your own head and be able to explain why using the word 'gay' in a nasty way can hurt other people and make things worse for LGBT people and all pupils

Remember small steps can become BIG strides.

What can I do?

You aren't involved in shcools, but you still want to help?

So, you want to help fight homophobia in schools, but either don't know where to begin, or don't have any involvement in schools.

Thank you. We need more people like you. If everyone were like you, I'd be out of a job. but the world would be a much friendlier place.

Training school staff and fighting homophobia in schools isn't an easy task, nor is it cheap. You can help offset these costs by donating to Inclusion For All if you have a PayPal account.

'Inclusion For All' is a small non profit making charitable organisation. If you have found this website and the resources useful please consider making a donation to ensure the upkeep of the site and to enable IFA to reach as many schools as possible. In this way we hope all schools will become inclusive communities for all children. Thank you'